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Caring for an Elderly Loved One with Aphasia

caring-for-an-elderly-loved-one-with-aphasia

Aphasia makes it difficult for patients to communicate their needs, which in turn makes it difficult for family caregivers to assist their loved ones without the help of professional home health care in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

What causes aphasia?

Aphasia can be caused by a trauma to the brain, such as a head injury, a stroke, an infection, or sometimes even a stroke. It can affect all areas of communication and language including writing, speech, gesticulation, and comprehension.

If you’re caring for a loved one with aphasia, feeling frustrated and overwhelmed by the responsibilities it entails is normal.

Here are some tips that we as a provider of professional health care services in Pennsylvania recommend:

  • Book your loved one an appointment with a speech pathologist.

    A speech-language pathologist (SLP) has the skills and expertise to accurately assess and gauge your loved one’s language and communication skills. They can also set realistic goals and milestones to guide your loved ones, to ensure effective treatment and care.
    Change the way you speak to your loved one.

    To make it easier for your loved one to understand your instructions or message, it’s important that you change your speaking style to fit their current capabilities. Try to speak more slowly and clearly — just enough to let your loved ones catch up with your words.

  • Expand your aphasia toolbox.

    Learning more about aphasia can help you find better ways you can assist your loved ones with their needs.

At Peace Health Care Agency provide our patients’ family members and caregivers the necessary resources and education they need to offer high-quality care and services to their loved ones.
If you wish to learn more about our programs for homecare in Pennsylvania, please don’t hesitate to contact us, today!

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